HiSLAC

An evaluation of the impact of High-Intensity Specialist-Led Acute Care (HiSLAC) on emergency admissions to NHS hospitals at weekends.

The HiSLAC project is funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR-HS&DR Programme Commissioned call 12/128: Organisation & delivery of 24/7 healthcare).

HiSLAC will evaluate a key component of NHS England's policy drive for 7-day services: the intensity of specialist-led care of emergency medical admissions, with a particular focus on weekend provision. This research is important for patients and for NHS strategy because it offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of the transition to seven-day working, and to understand factors likely to impede or enhance the effectiveness of this change in practice.

In addition to examining the impact on patient-centred outcomes, the project will also undertake a health economics analysis of the impact of increasing specialist provision across the NHS in order to deliver the vision set out by the NHS Services Seven Days a Week Forum. HiSLAC will therefore provide useful information across the NHS about the cost-effectiveness of investing in consultant and other specialist staffing in implementing the drive to 7-day service provision.

The decision on award of funding was made in September 2013 and the project launched in February 2014. This website will be updated over the coming weeks and months as the project progresses.

Rolling News

  • HiSLAC National Survey Launches Today

    Today, all consultants and associate specialists will be asked to complete the third annual HiSLAC survey - a short anonymised questionnaire to contribute to a nationwide ‘snapshot’ of specialist intensity and 7-day services.

  • Literature Review Protocol Published

    The protocol for HiSLAC’s systematic review of seven day services literature has been published in the Systematic Reviews Journal.

  • First findings from NHS 7-day services study published in The Lancet

    The first HiSLAC paper has found no association between hospital specialist weekend staffing and weekend emergency admission mortality risk. Published today in The Lancet, the authors say further investigation is needed but warned that policy makers should exercise caution before attributing the weekend effect primarily to differences in specialist senior staffing.

  • Bridging the research-practice gap

    HiSLAC’s Communications Fellow, Louise Rowan has published an article on using communications techniques and technologies to maximise the impact of healthcare research.

Due to recent bed pressures patients are often sent from the Acute Medical Unit to the wards without a consultant review, and in some cases without a registrar review.

On the wards it is 'pot luck' whether the patient is seen by a consultant the following day or a few days down the line.

Once the patient is identified under the correct team it depends on which day a consultant does their ward rounds, which means a delay up to 5-6 days.

The patient was an outlier; no one knew the patient and wanted to take any responsibility.

- Reflections of a Foundation Year 1 trainee, January 2013

HiSLAC Tweets

HiSLAC

Over the past two years, more than more than 28,000 senior staff have taken part in our #7dayservices survey ow.ly/WuBH301h7L4

HiSLAC

Specialist or consultant? There’s only a few weeks to complete your HiSLAC #7dayservices survey – it takes just 2 minutes to complete

HiSLAC

HiSLAC

Specialist or consultant? Are you taking part in HiSLAC? Watch out for an email from your Trust’s local lead #7dayservices #nhsresearch

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